10-Year Trend of Educational Performance 2005 - 2014

Published Date: 20 November 2015 12:00 AM

News Press Releases

1. The Ministry of Education releases data annually on the 10-year trend of the performance of our students. The objective is to provide feedback to the community on how our children have fared over the last 10 years.

2. Year-to-year fluctuations are to be expected as each batch of students is different, so it is more meaningful to focus on longer-term trends over 10 years.

Summary: Overall 10-year Trend of Educational Performance (2005 - 2014)

Percentage of Primary 1 (P1) Cohort that Progressed to Post-Secondary Education

3. The percentage of each P1 Cohort that progressed to post-secondary education has improved steadily over the last 10 years (from 90% in 2005 to 96% in 2014).

Performance in National Exams

4. A-Level. At the A-Level, the overall percentage of students with at least 3 ‘A’/’H2’ passes and a pass in General Paper or Knowledge and Inquiry has improved over the last 10 years, from 87% in 2005 to 91% in 2014. The percentage of A-Level students who passed General Paper or Knowledge and Inquiry has remained high, at above 90%.

5. O-Level. The overall percentage of students with at least three and five O-Level passes have remained stable over the last 10 years. The percentage of O-Level students who passed English Language has increased over the last 10 years (from 86% in 2005 to 88% in 2014).

6. PSLE. PSLE results have remained stable over the last 10 years, both in terms of overall percentage of passes and the percentage of PSLE students who scored A*-C in each subject.

Detailed Description of Charts

7. The following charts for the last 10 years (2005 - 2014) are attached:

  • A chart on the percentage of each P1 cohort that progressed to post-secondary education1.
  • Three sets of charts showing the performance of the major ethnic groups in the A- and O-Level Exams and the PSLE2.

Percentage Of P1 Cohort that Progressed To Post-Secondary Education (Chart A)

8. The percentage of a P1 cohort that progressed to post-secondary education3 has remained high, at above 90%. See Chart A.

Performance In A-Level (Charts B1 - B3)

Performance by Overall Measure

9. The percentage of A-Level students who obtained at least 3 ‘A’/’H2’ passes and passed General Paper or Knowledge and Inquiry has increased over the last 10 years (from 87% in 2005 to 91% in 2014). See Chart B1.

Performance by Subject

10. The overall pass rates in General Paper (GP) or Knowledge and Inquiry and Mother Tongue Language has remained high, at above 90%. See Charts B2 and B3.

Performance In O-Level (Charts C1 - C5)

Performance by Overall Measure

11. The percentage of O-Level students with at least 3 O-Level passes has remained high, at around 95%, while the percentage with at least 5 O-Level passes has remained above 80%. See Charts C1 and C2.

Performance by Subject

12. The overall pass rates for English Language, Mother Tongue Language and Mathematics have remained high and are comparable with the previous years (above 85%, 95% and 85% respectively). See Charts C3 - C5. The percentage of O-Level students who passed English Language has increased over the last 10 years (from 86% in 2005 to 88% in 2014).

Performance In PSLE (Charts D1 - D5)

Performance by Overall Measure

13. PSLE candidates continued to perform well, with an overall percentage pass rate of above 95%. See Chart D1.

Performance by Subject

14. The overall percentage of PSLE students who scored A-C in English Language and Mother Tongue Language has remained high, at above 95%, while the percentage who scored A-C in Mathematics and Science has remained above 80% and around 90% respectively. See Charts D2 - D5.

Footnote:
  1. The percentages are based on students who were enrolled in P1 10 years ago.
  2. The percentages are based on school candidates who sat for the respective exams.
  3. Junior colleges, Centralised Institute, Polytechnics, ITE, LASALLE College of the Arts, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (NAFA) and other private education institutions, and take into account students who have left the country.
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